CRPF Full Form – All About Central Reserve Police Force

CRPF stands for Central Reserve Police Force. It is a term related to Governmental » Weapons & Forces, Useful Terms and Definitions which we use in daily life but we do not know their full name, Here’s a list of important abbreviations that you should know.

AcronymFull Form
CRPFCentral Reserve Police Force
CategoryGovernmental » Weapons & Forces
RegionIndia

What is full form of CRPF?

The full form of CRPF is the Central Reserve Police Force. The Central Police Reserve (CRPF) is the largest of the Indian Central Armed Police Forces (CAPF) under the aegis of the Ministry of the Interior (MHA) of the Government of India. The primary role of the CRPF is to assist the union states and territories in police operations to maintain public order and deter rebels.Established on July 27, 1939.

Here you learn the full name and complete information of Central Reserve Police Force, if you have questions and answers related to CRPF, then tell us your thoughts in the comment, know the complete meaning of CRPF in this article.

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Which is the full form of CRPF in India?

Full form of CRPF? – FullForms What does CRPF mean? The Central Police Reserve (CRPF) is the largest of the Indian Central Police Force (CAPF) under the aegis of the Ministry of the Interior (MHA) of the Government of India.

When did central reserve police force become CRPF?

After Indian Independence, it became the Central Reserve Police Force on enactment of the CRPF Act on 28 December 1949. Besides law and order and counter-insurgency duties, the CRPF has played an increasingly large role in India’s general elections.

Why did the All India Congress Committee raise the CRPF?

The CRPF was raised as a continuation of political unrest and agitation in the then princely states of India following the resolution of the Madras All-India Congress Committee in 1936 and the ever-increasing desire of the Crown Representative to help the vast majority of indigenous states maintain law and order as part of imperial policy.